HanCinema Film Review: The Wailing

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(Image and text are samples from my work on HanCinema.net and belong to HanCinema.)

Na Hong-jin (The Chaser, The Yellow Sea) has brought the world another blockbuster that screened at Cannes, was picked up by Well Go USA Entertainment, and released in North American June 3. Welcome horror mystery The Wailing to the ranks of the modern day film successes. It boasts of the eighth largest Korean opening, a two and a half hour run time, a myriad of horror and thriller elements, and a little bit of the absurd.

Check out the rest of the review on HanCinema!

HanCinema Film Review: Phantom Detective

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So the New York Times didn’t like the film, but I sure did. People are so invested into adrenaline-pumping films nowadays that slower-paced films are often blindly dismissed. Don’t do that to “Phantom Detective!”

Here’s a snippet of my HanCinema review:

Director Jo Sung-hee’s Phantom Detective is a play on the crime noir complete with anti-hero Hong Gil-dong (Lee Je-hoon), a decrepit town, deranged villains, and stylized filming that brings the world of the comic book to life. There are also two unlikely sidekicks, two little girls who rework Gil-dong’s damaged psyche over the course of the film.

Phantom Detective was released in Korea May 4, 2016 and 508,000 filmgoers (19.9%) sat down to watch a modern take of the classic Korean tale of “Hong Gil Dong”. Last weekend, May 13, 2016, the film premiered in Los Angeles and May 20 saw a wider North American release.

Click here to read the full review!

HanCinema Film Review: Time Renegades

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Time Renegades the time-travel film from Director Kwak Jae-Yong (Daisy, My Sassy Girl) came in number one its opening weekend and for good reason. It was a slick piece that balanced the two worlds it depicted and the relationship between dream-tied strangers realistically and with plenty of suspense. It premiered in South Korea on April 13, 2016, and had its North American release by CJ E&M on April 22, 2016.

The plot centers around two seemingly disparate storylines set in 1983 and 2015 that become intertwined by fate, murder, and love. Nothing about this premise is unusual – save for its execution. The uncanny parallels between the lives and love stories of 1983’s Ji-Hwan (Jo Jeong-seok) and Yoon-jeong (Im Soo-jeong), and Geon-woo (Lee Jin-wook) and So-eun (Im Soo-jeong) are highlighted by Director Kwan’s trademark ability to juxtapose scenes with elegant cuts, filtered shots, and keen sense of camera story telling.

Click here to read the whole review!

“Twenty” – A Film Review

by: Raine

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Coming-of-age films are a dime a dozen. So what makes “Twenty” any different from its comrades? For one, it boasts of a star-studded cast that shot it into the spotlight. Luckily, the cast was more than capable of pulling off the raunchy dialogue, coming-of-age antics, and moments of gravity that accompany the shell shock of stepping into the real world. The three headliners, Kim Woo-bin, Lee Junho, and Kang Ha-neul, were more than capable of taking on their roles. Continue reading